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The results of Feminism

March 22, 2011
clipped from stuartschneiderman.blogspot.com

But still, I believe that feminism has contributed more than its fair share to this tendency of women to try to hang on to their youth.

If an older woman is competing against a younger woman for a man’s attention, then perhaps she will do whatever she can to make herself look younger.

If this is true, then the situation Gloria is railing against is the fallout from feminist policies.

Believing that women should be liberated from their marriages, feminism also worked long and hard to destigmatize divorce.

Over the past four decades this, unsurprisingly, has produced a spike in the divorce rate.
In turn, this has created a new cohort, the fortysomething divorcees who are back on the mating market, looking for second husbands.
It makes you wish for a return to the old days when people married young and built a life together. But, of course, feminism hated those days…
feminism has helped to create a class of thirtysomething husband-seekers whose prospective mates are eyeing younger women.

Harp seal sightings confound biologists

March 22, 2011
clipped from www.boston.com
Harp seals from Canada are showing up in US waters in greater numbers and farther south than usual, and biologists want to know why.
This year, we’ve had four sightings of adult harp seals in North Carolina, which we’ve never had before. We typically don’t see them that far south

Seals are common in New England waters, where the most abundant type is the harbor seal, with a population estimated at about 100,000 the last time they were surveyed a decade ago. Gray seals are the second most common seal.

Canada’s Department of Fisheries and Oceans says 9 million of them can be found off Canada and Greenland.

A decade ago, harp seal sightings off Maine were rare, said Lynda Doughty, marine mammal stranding coordinator for the state Department of Marine Resources. The numbers have picked up the past few years, and this year there have been 40 documented sightings — more than double the number spotted last year.

Best Moment To Drink Water

February 21, 2011
clipped from us.mg2.mail.yahoo.com
Drinking Water at Precised Moment of Time Maximises its Efficacity
                        in Human Body :
  *   2 Glasses of Water When 1st Get Out the Bed Activates the Internal Organs;

 *   1 Glass of Water 30 Minutes Before Eating Helps to Have a Good Digestion;

 *  1 Glass of Water Before Taking a Shower Helps Lower The Arterial Tense
       (Blood Pressure) ;

 *   1 Glass of Water Before Going To Bed Help Avoid Heart Attacks


Postojna. Cave created by the Pivka River.

February 21, 2011
clipped from www.travelstar1.com
The cave was first described in the 17th century by Johann Weichard Valvasor(Slovene: Janez Vajkard Valvasor), and a new area of the cave was discovered accidentally in 1818 by local Luka Cec, when he was preparing the hitherto known parts of the cave for a visit by Francis I, the first Emperor of Austria. In 1819, the caves were opened to the public, and Cec went on to become the first official tourist guide for the caves. Electric lighting was added in 1884, preceding even Ljubljana, the capital of Carniola, the Austro-Hungarian province the cave was part of at the time, and further enhancing the cave system’s popularity.
After 1945, the gas locomotive was replaced by an electric one. 5.3 km of the caves are open to the public, the longest publicly accessible depth of any cave system in the world. The caves are also home to the endemic olm, the largest trogloditic amphibian in the world. The tour through the caves includes an aquarium with some olms in it.
Postojna Cave 0001 Postojna. Cave created by the Pivka River.
Postojna Cave 0002 Postojna. Cave created by the Pivka River.
Postojna Cave 0003 Postojna. Cave created by the Pivka River.
Postojna Cave 0004 Postojna. Cave created by the Pivka River.
Postojna Cave 0005 Postojna. Cave created by the Pivka River.
Postojna Cave 0006 Postojna. Cave created by the Pivka River.
Postojna Cave 0007 Postojna. Cave created by the Pivka River.
Postojna Cave 0008 Postojna. Cave created by the Pivka River.
Postojna Cave 0009 Postojna. Cave created by the Pivka River.
Postojna Cave 0010 Postojna. Cave created by the Pivka River.
Postojna Cave 0011 Postojna. Cave created by the Pivka River.
Postojna Cave 0012 Postojna. Cave created by the Pivka River.
Postojna Cave 0013 Postojna. Cave created by the Pivka River.
Postojna Cave 0014 Postojna. Cave created by the Pivka River.
Postojna Cave 0015 Postojna. Cave created by the Pivka River.
Postojna Cave 0016 Postojna. Cave created by the Pivka River.
Postojna Cave 0017 Postojna. Cave created by the Pivka River.
Postojna Cave 0018 Postojna. Cave created by the Pivka River.
Postojna Cave 0019 Postojna. Cave created by the Pivka River.

A new species of seahorse discovered

February 21, 2011
clipped from www.dailymail.co.uk
Hippocampus paradoxus: Caught in 1995 off south-western Australia, this specimen was taken to a museum where it lay unnoticed for more than ten years

A new species of seahorse has been discovered – more than ten years after the tiny specimen was put on display in a museum.

The creature was caught in 1995 in waters off south-western Australia and taken to a local museum.

But it went unnoticed until 2006 when a staff member realised it was unusual.

Ralph Foster examined it closely and after performing a CT scan concluded it was a type of seahorse previously unknown to science.

The creature, which is just a few millimetres long,  is unlike any other variety because it doesn’t have a dorsal fin.

It has been named Hippocampus paradoxus. The name paradoxus was chosen because of its meaning – strange and contrary to all expectation.

Mr Foster, the collections manager at the South Australian Museum in Adelaide, said: ‘We know very little about this weird little beast. 

There are currently about 230,000 known species of sea creature, but scientists estimate that is less than 30 per cent of the number that actually exist.

Incredible Geological Wonders

February 21, 2011
clipped from www.environmentalgraffiti.com
Pamukkale, Turkey
Travertine covered pools at Pamukkale, Turkey
These stunning terraces of water
were shaped from a substance called travertine, which forms from the build-up of sediments of calcium carbonate deposited in water from hot springs. Then the calcium dioxide degasses and you are left with these beautiful terraces, with warm water flowing over them
Bungle Bungles, Australia
bungle bungles
They are beehive shaped mounds with tiger striping caused by bacteria growing on the gray stripes and iron manganese on the red.
The Blue Grotto, Italy
Blue_Grotto_Capri
The Blue Grotto in Capri is a gorgeous cave with a brilliant blue color to it due to two separate sources of light. One is tiny, the opening you can see in this picture which allows small rowboats in. The other opening is much larger and beneath the first, sending in rays of light into the cave from below
Sailing Stones
Sailing stones
This
phenomenon occurs at Racetrack Playa, Death Valley
The stones travel long distances without any human or animal help
making a trail or groove in the rock surface as they travel

Kissable Lips

February 21, 2011
clipped from groups.yahoo.com

Artist Paige Thompson had a foxy idea
when she puckered up in front of the mirror and started to paint these amazing animal designs – on her own lips.

Now her unique take on face-painting has become an Internet sensation, attracting thousands of followers to her website and sparking demand for new creations.

The 21-year-old was feeling bored when she stumbled across some Halloween make-up she had as a child and began to paint colourful and cute animals on her mouth before photographing them.

A red crab: Paige takes half an hour in front of
a mirror to paint each creation

A red fox: An early creation and one of Paige’s favourites

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