Skip to content

Dark Energy’s Effects Clearly Seen For The First Time

December 22, 2008
The X-ray results combined with supernovas information has given astronomers the best data so far about dark energy properties and it clearly shows that dark energy exists and it’s a cosmological constant. However, this raises another debate as scientists believe now that hidden dimensions really exist.

“Putting all of this data together gives us the strongest evidence yet that dark energy is the cosmological constant, or in other words, that ‘nothing weighs something’. A lot more testing is needed, but so far Einstein’s theory is looking as good as ever,” added Vikhlinin.

Ultimately, the astronomers predicted the destiny of the Universe that will continue to accelerate and expand which means that the Milky Way and the Andromeda galaxies will never merge with the Virgo galaxy clusters. In conclusion, the astronomers believe that about 100 billion years from now, we will not be able to see other galaxies from the Milky Way, and many other galaxy clusters will eventually decompose.

clipped from devicedaily.com

One of the biggest mystery in the Universe is the so-called dark energy. Scientists and astronomers don’t know exactly what it is, only that is dark and that is something like an energy. However, thanks to the advance in science, astronomers managed for the first time in history to clearly see the effects of the dark energy on Galaxy clusters.

The astronomers spotted the effects using NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory and they put together a theory of what dark energy could be and what’s the destiny of the Universe. This is a result of years of hard work and according to the scientists, it’s different from other dark energy-related research methods which are based on supernovas and distance measurements.

The team of researchers from the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory in Cambridge, Mass., used this new method of testing dark energy by observing how the growth of galaxy clusters are affected by cosmic acceleration over time.

No comments yet

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: