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Brains learn better at night

August 20, 2007
The idea of being a morning person or an evening person might not be so far-fetched.
clipped from www.physorg.com


Martin Sale demonstrates the technique to stimulate nerve activity in the brain. Credit: University of Adelaide
Martin Sale demonstrates the technique to stimulate nerve activity in the brain. Credit: University of Adelaide



If you think that the idea of a morning person or an evening person is nonsense, then postgraduate student Martin Sale and his colleagues from the University of Adelaide have news for you.

They have found that the time of day influences your brain’s ability to learn – and the human brain learns more effectively in the evening.
And by identifying at what point in the day the brain is best able to operate, rehabilitation therapy can be targeted to that time, when recovery is maximised.
“Our research has several future applications,” Mr Sale says. “If the brains of stroke patients can be artificially stimulated to improve learning, they may be able to recover better and faster.”
His study found that larger changes are induced when the experiments are performed in the evening, as compared with mornings.
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